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Maryland Adopts Canine Scent Detection Rules

Bed bugs

Under the rule, both the dog and the dog's handler must be certified by a recognized person or organization for pest detection.

| July 10, 2013

ANNAPOLIS, Md. - In a first of its kind action, the Maryland Department of Agriculture recently adopted rulemaking establishing requirements specific to canine scent detection teams performing pest control services, NPMA announced. The rule went into effect on July 8.
 
Under the rule, both the dog and dog's handler must be certified as satisfactorily trained for pest detection by an individual or organization recognized by the Department. A team shall be recertified each year as satisfactorily trained in pest detection work. Each person who operates a pest control business that utilizes canine scent detection teams shall maintain records of the training of each team and its certification. The rulemaking is very similar to NPMA's Bed Bug Best Management Practices. The recently enacted Chicago bed bug ordinance incorporates NPMA's Bed Bug BMPs by reference.
 
 

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