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E.O. Wilson: Technology to Blame For Animal Die-Off Panic

Technology & Internet

Mass deaths 'generally fly under the radar' but global communication sparked sinister theories.

| January 12, 2011

First, the blackbirds fell out of the sky on New Year's Eve in Arkansas. In recent days, wildlife have mysteriously died in big numbers: 2 million fish in the Chesapeake Bay, 150 tons of red tilapia in Vietnam, 40,000 crabs in Britain and other places across the world.

Blame technology, says famed Harvard biologist E.O. Wilson. With the Internet, cell phones and worldwide communications, people are noticing events, connecting the dots more.

"This instant and global communication, it's just a human instinct to read mystery and portents of dangers and wondrous things in events that are unusual," Wilson told The Associated Press. "Not to worry, these are not portents that the world is about to come to an end."

To read the entire article from MSNBC, click here.

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