Secret Site Map
Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Home News E.O. Wilson: Technology to Blame For Animal Die-Off Panic

E.O. Wilson: Technology to Blame For Animal Die-Off Panic

Technology & Internet

Mass deaths 'generally fly under the radar' but global communication sparked sinister theories.

| January 12, 2011

First, the blackbirds fell out of the sky on New Year's Eve in Arkansas. In recent days, wildlife have mysteriously died in big numbers: 2 million fish in the Chesapeake Bay, 150 tons of red tilapia in Vietnam, 40,000 crabs in Britain and other places across the world.

Blame technology, says famed Harvard biologist E.O. Wilson. With the Internet, cell phones and worldwide communications, people are noticing events, connecting the dots more.

"This instant and global communication, it's just a human instinct to read mystery and portents of dangers and wondrous things in events that are unusual," Wilson told The Associated Press. "Not to worry, these are not portents that the world is about to come to an end."

To read the entire article from MSNBC, click here.

Top news

Terminix Places Top Talent Behind International Division

Larry Pruitt and Jason Bailey have been appointed to new roles designed to drive its strategy to increase its international footprint.

Terminix Acquires Assets of Quebec-Based Groupe Cameron

The entrance into the Quebec province expands Terminix's presence in Canada.

Police Officer Hospitalized After 100+ Yellowjacket Stings

A Georgia police officer was rushed to the hospital after a swarm of yellowjackets attacked him during a chase Wednesday, WSBTV reported.

Peanut Executive Guilty in Deadly Salmonella Outbreak

A jury in Georgia convicted a former peanut company owner Friday of conspiracy, fraud and other federal charges in a groundbreaking case stemming from a deadly salmonella outbreak almost six years ago.

BedBug Central Introduces SenSci Volcano and SenSci Activ

SenSci Volcano, a bed bug monitor, and SenSci Activ, a bed bug lure are products that can be used in combination for detection.

x