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Home News Chuck Steinmetz Commits $5 million to University of Florida

Chuck Steinmetz Commits $5 million to University of Florida

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The gift from Chuck and Lynn Steinmetz to create five new permanent endowments, including three professorships, an entrepreneurship fellowship fund, a research fund and additional support for an existing student scholarship fund.

| January 19, 2011

John CapineraGAINESVILLE, Fla. — Longtime Florida resident Charles Steinmetz has made a career out of the study and management of insects and now wants to make sure the future of pest management research and education continues at the University of Florida.

UF officials announced today that Steinmetz and his wife, Lynn, have committed $5 million to create five new permanent endowments, including three professorships, an entrepreneurship fellowship fund, a research fund and additional support for an existing student scholarship fund. The support is directed to UF’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences’ Department of Entomology and Nematology.

UF has had entomology and nematology programs in place since 1915, according to John Capinera, professor and chairman of UF’s entomology and nematology department.

“Florida is at the epicenter of the influx of insects to the continental U.S.,” Capinera says. “These invading pests can prove to be very disruptive to natural and managed ecosystems, including human and animal health and welfare. And our native insects also thrive in our benign climate, so we have a disproportionately high frequency of problems with insects in Florida.”

The professorships to be established with the Steinmetzes’ gift will address these ongoing and growing issues of pest management, including new invaders and the need to apply emerging technology to solve complex problems.

“Pest management is a highly technical field,” Charles Steinmetz says. “And UF is in an ideal position to expand on the technology needed to help the industry provide better results. UF researchers are also focused on reducing the negative impact and exposure of pest management methods on the environment, which is very important to me.”

Steinmetz has been a leader in the pest control industry for more than 40 years. Steinmetz received a bachelor’s degree in agricultural and life sciences from UF in 1961. He has served in various capacities with Orkin (1961-73) and Truly Nolen (1974-77), and led the build-up and sale of All America Termite and Pest Control (1982-97). At the time of sale it was the largest privately owned pest control company in the United States with 125 locations throughout Florida, Georgia, Alabama, North and South Carolina, Louisiana, Tennessee, Mississippi, Arizona and Texas.

Following the sale of All America, Steinmetz was involved in Middleton Pest Control's growth from 1977 until June 2005 when it was sold to Sunair. Steinmetz has received several awards and distinctions during his career, including being named Entrepreneur of the Year in 1992 by Inc. Magazine for the Southeast service category, PCT Professional of the Year in 1996, and he received the 2002 Pioneer Award from the Florida Pest Management Association for service to the pest control industry.

The Steinmetzes, who live in Winter Park, Fla., have a long history of financial support to UF. They previously established an endowed scholarship fund for entomology graduate students. They are also involved in supporting the visual and performing arts in the Orlando area. Charles Steinmetz serves on the board of directors of both the Orlando Science Center and the University of Florida Foundation, Inc.

“Chuck Steinmetz is a true champion in the field of pest management,” says Jack Payne, UF’s senior vice president for agriculture and natural resources. “His career, and now his philanthropy, will have a permanent and positive effect on an industry that impacts the entire nation.”
 In recognition of the couple’s gift, the current building housing the UF Department of Entomology and Nematology on the Gainesville campus will be named Charles Steinmetz Hall, pending approval by the UF Board of Trustees at its March meeting.

The gifts from the Steinmetzes to endow the three professorships also results in additional funds for UF’s entomology and nematology department as part of a UF initiative launched this past fall titled “Faculty Now.” The incentive program provides extra funding equaling 4 percent of a gift or commitment to endow faculty positions at UF. The funds are made available immediately and can be used in a variety of ways for faculty support.

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