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Rose Pest Solutions Employee Fosters Honeybees in Back Yard

Stinging Insects, People

Barb Craig works by day as a marketing manager at Rose Pest Solutions, but at home, she’s a honeybee foster mom.

| June 24, 2010

Barb Craig works by day as a marketing manager at Rose Pest Solutions, but at home, she’s a honeybee foster mom.

“I know the irony of a person who works at a pest control company hosting a honeybee hive; but a pest control company isn’t just about eliminating pests, but knowing which insects are beneficial, and doing what we can to save and support them,” Craig said.

The unlikely alliance between Craig and her bees came earlier this year when she met Tom Jenkins, a local beekeeper, who teaches his beekeeping at the Madison Heights Nature Center when he’s not teaching auto mechanics at Hazel Park High School.

To read the entire Daily Tribune article, click here: http://www.dailytribune.com/articles/2010/06/19/news/doc4c1cfa1ee87fd838398943.txt
 

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