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OvoControl Performance Reported by Las Vegas Parks

The parks have been on an OvoControl program for eight months.

| June 28, 2011

Rancho Santa Fe, Calif. — In this article from the Sunday Las Vegas Sun, the Clark County Real Property Management Department reported that pigeon numbers in four treated parks seem to be declining — and pigeons, not other birds, are the only ones getting the bait.
 
Kevin Parker, Clark County Parks Maintenance Division assistant manager claims the evidence suggests a declining number of pigeons.  The four parks have been on an OvoControl program for eight months. 
 
Parker indicated that complaints about pigeon droppings are down and maintenance workers also seem to be spending less time scrubbing pigeon poop off benches and other park equipment.
 
It is common for OvoControl treated sites to report "less birds" within the first 6-8 months of the program, the product’s manufacturer says. 
 
See the complete article here.

For more information about the product, visit www.ovocontrol.com

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