Secret Site Map
Thursday, November 27, 2014

Home News J.F. Oakes Offers Pro-Pest Powerful Rechargeable Solar Flashlight

J.F. Oakes Offers Pro-Pest Powerful Rechargeable Solar Flashlight

Supplier News

The Pro-Pest rechargeable solar flashlight can be recharged three ways.

| July 28, 2011

Yazoo City, Miss. — J.F. Oakes offers pest management professionals a powerful rechargeable solar flashlight with the Pro-Pest Solar Flashlight. This flashlight uses a 1-watt USA Cree LED. Cree LEDs are brighter and last longer than standard LEDs, the firm says.

The Pro-Pest rechargeable solar flashlight can be recharged three ways:

  1. In a vehicle with the DC adaptor.
  2. By the sun.
  3. In an office or home with the AC adaptor.


The Pro-Pest Solar Flashlight comes with both AC & DC charging adaptors, has on/off switch and has a durable anodized aluminum body. There is no filament to burn out or break. Visit  www.jfoakes.com for more information on the firm’s pest control products.
 

Top news

NPMA Announces Opening for Director of Regulatory Affairs Position

The National Pest Management Association (NPMA) is seeking a qualified regulatory affairs professional to direct the day-to-day management and execution of NPMA’s federal and state regulatory affairs programs

Ehrlich Selected to Protect National Landmarks

The company has been selected by the National Park Service to install and maintain effective termite control systems for 14 national historic sites in the Delaware Valley, including Independence Hall.

NC State: Warmer Temps Limit Impact of Parasites, Boost Pest Populations

Research from North Carolina State University shows that some insect pests are thriving in warm, urban environments and developing earlier, limiting the impact of parasitoid wasps that normally help keep those pest populations in check.

PCO Caldwell in Country Gospel Music Video

Ronnie Caldwell, president of Innovative Pest Management, Denver, N.C., is one of the stars of the new Bruce Hedrick video 'A Better Man.'

Fruit Flies Learn From Others, Researchers Say

When female fruit flies have to decide where to lay their eggs, they take their lead from what they see most others in their group do, new research shows.

x