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Bayer Cropscience Acquires Green, Bee Health Product From Exosect

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Bayer CropScience AG acquires innovative product for the control of varroa mites in honey bees from Exosect Ltd.

| November 18, 2010

Winchester, Hampshire, UK — Exosect announced the recent acquisition of its unique product for the control of varroa mites in honey bees by Bayer CropScience.

The acquisition was made for an undisclosed figure and gives Bayer CropScience worldwide rights to sell the product and to further develop a portfolio of bee health products for the control of mites (including varroa mites and tracheal mites) using Exosect’s platform technology, Entostat.

“After five years of research, we are delighted to have developed a product for this incredibly important sector and we believe that Bayer is very well placed to bring the product to market,” said Martin Brown, Exosect’s managing director. “Our platform technology, Entostat powder, has such huge potential in all sectors of pest control that despite our interest in the bee health sector we are unable to give the launch of this product the resource that it deserves. We are now able to use the substantial funds generated from this acquisition to continue to bring further exciting products through from our extensive product development pipeline.”

“Bayer is aware of its responsibility as a producer both of crop protection products and of bee health products,” said Dr. Franz-Josef Placke, head of development at Bayer CropScience. “Therefore, we are investing in research and development to provide beekeepers with sustainable solutions to improve the health of their bees and beehives.”

The product, developed by Exosect Ltd., is for the efficient and cost effective control of varroa mites in honey bees. It is based on Entostat powder, Exosects’ patented platform technology and the active ingredient thymol. The Entostat powder, which is derived from a natural, food-grade wax, develops an electrostatic charge, even through very slight movement. When placed in contact with bees, the powder adheres to them and can be passed from one bee to another through direct contact. The technology means that only minute quantities of thymol are required, which reduces the potential for thymol residues in honey crops.
 

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