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Texas Pest Control Association Mourns Colleagues

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Former TPCA President Louis "Mac" McClish owned Mac McClish Pest Control in Amarillo.

| December 16, 2010

Austin, Texas — The Texas Pest Control Association alerted members to several deaths in the TPCA family this past week.

Louis “Mac” McClish, TPCA Life Member, died Dec. 11 at the age of 91. Mac served in the U.S. Army in World War II and was the owner of Mac McClish Pest Control in Amarillo, Texas. He served as TPCA president in 1958. The family suggests memorials be to Anna Street Church of Christ, 2310 Anna Street, Amarillo, Texas, 79106.
 
Patty Markle, wife of longtime TPCA board member Jay Markle, also passed away this week.
 
Additionally, the mother of TPCA Past President Shawn Felts, Yvonne Felts, also died this week.
 
“We hope you will join us in sending your thoughts, prayers and support to the families,” said TPCA President Tim Gafford, Gafford Pest Control, Lubbock, Texas.
 

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