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Spider Bite May Have Contributed to Death of Slayer Guitarist

Stinging Insects

Jeff Hanneman died Thursday from liver failure brought on by necrotizing fasciitis, a disease Hanneman believed he contracted from a spider bite.

| May 3, 2013

Jeff Hanneman, guitarist for the band Slayer, died Thursday from liver failure brought on by necrotizing fasciitis, a disease Hanneman believed he contracted from a spider bite.

"Slayer is devastated to inform that their bandmate and brother, Jeff Hanneman, passed away at about 11 a.m. this morning near his Southern California home," a statement posted on the band's Facebook page read. "Hanneman was in an area hospital when he suffered liver failure. He is survived by his wife Kathy, his sister Kathy and his brothers Michael and Larry, and will be sorely missed."

Hanneman and Kerry King founded the band in southern California in 1981. The band has been awarded two Grammys for best metal performance and has four gold albums.

In 2011, Hanneman contracted necrotizing fasciitis, which he believed he got from a spider bite.

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Source: http://www.today.com
 

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