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Cold Weather Brings Stink Bugs Back In

Occasional Invaders

Brown marmorated stink bugs are creeping from walls, attics and other hiding places, drawn by rising thermostats to the comfort and warmth of your house, the Columbus Dispatch reports.

| January 28, 2014

Brown marmorated stink bugs are creeping from walls, attics and other hiding places, drawn by rising thermostats to the comfort and warmth of your house, the Columbus Dispatch reports.

“They don’t really want to be in your house. There’s nothing you have that they want,” said Mike Hogan, an associate professor of agriculture at Ohio State University and an OSU Extension educator.

“They re just looking for protection until they can be outside in the spring.”

Most of the species, native to Asia, can winter just fine under tree bark or woodland debris. But the intrepid among them climb through cracks and crevices in your house beginning in October.

The bugs were first identified in the United States in Allentown, Pa., in 1998. They reached Ohio about 10 years ago and now are present in about 40 states. Like other invasive species, they probably arrived in shipping containers from Asia.

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Source: Columbus Dispatch



 

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