Secret Site Map
Sunday, April 19, 2015

Home News Stink Bugs Benefit from Government Shutdown

Stink Bugs Benefit from Government Shutdown

News Coverage

Government-funded research into finding ways to control the bugs’ booming population is on hiatus.

| October 17, 2013

LANHAM, Md. — Not only is the government shutdown causing problems for furloughed federal employees, it’s also indirectly benefitting one of nature’s nuances: stink bugs, CBS news reports.

Chris Bergh, an entomologist working at Virginia Tech, said this year’s stink bug numbers could be on par with 2010, which was the initial outbreak year, and that the government shutdown isn’t helping.

That’s because government-funded research into finding ways to control the bugs’ booming population is on hiatus. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture who are in charge of tracking and documenting the bugs aren’t allowed to work during the shutdown, which is now in its third week.

Begh said the shutdown has “disrupted our ability to interact directly with the project director” at the USDA, which is coordinating the “multi-state, multi-institution project.” He also said that applications for new research grants are threatened due to the shutdown.

Source: http://washington.cbslocal.com

Top news

Family Believed to be Sickened by Pesticide at Virgin Islands Resort

A Delaware family is back home and in the hospital after getting sick while on vacation, due to possible exposure to methyl bromide.

Terminix Acquires Team Too Termite & Pest Control

Team Too, headquartered in Corona, Calif., has five offices throughout California and specializes in commercial and multi-family accounts.

Termidor SC Can Now Be Applied Up to Four Times Per Year

BASF announced the approval of new label use directions by Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that allow Termidor SC termiticide/insecticide to be used up to four times per year.

Catseye Hosts Ribbon-Cutting Ceremony for New Florida Office

The company's customers and other guests celebrated the one-year anniversary of Catseye's Bonita Springs, Fla., office.

Tick-Borne 'Bourbon Virus' Cause of Kansas Man's Death

Researchers have identified the cause of a Kansas farmer's mysterious death last summer.

x