Secret Site Map
Sunday, April 20, 2014

Home News Why Some Termites Become Queens and Others Don't

Why Some Termites Become Queens and Others Don't

Termite Control

New research explains which specific chemicals are used by some termite queens to prevent other termites in the colony from becoming mommies like themselves.

| July 19, 2010

WASHINGTON  -  New research explains which specific chemicals are used by some termite queens to prevent other termites in the colony from becoming mommies like themselves.

NC State's Dr. Ed Vargo and colleagues from Japan and Switzerland show that a combination of two chemical compounds in a pheromone perfume emitted by egg-laying females known as secondary queens can inhibit other termites from developing into new queens.

"With this long missing key ingredient now in hand, I expect we'll see rapid progress in understanding how reproductive and non-reproductive termite castes develop," said Vargo.

This 'discrimination' is required to maintain a balance - proper proportion of workers who forage for food and take care of larvae, soldiers who defend the colony, and secondary queens who lay eggs to increase a colony's numbers.

The study is published online in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (ANI).

Top news

More Mazdas Recalled Due to Spider Problem

The latest recall involves 42,000 Mazda6 midsize sedans from the 2010-12 model years, and equipped with the 2.5-liter, four-cylinder engine.

Photos: Bed Bugs vs. Bat Bugs

Additional photos from Dr. Michael Potter for the August PCT feature 'Holy Cow...Bat Bugs and Bird Bugs.'

Win a Copy of the New PCT Commercial Pest Management Book

Enter your name for a chance to win a copy of this new industry resource focused on treating a variety of commercial accounts.

Allgood Announces Corporate Promotions; Acquisition of Rich Exterminators

The company’s promotions are part of its strategic growth plans. Rich Exterminators is a Lawrenceville, Ga.-based company founded by Howard Rich in 1989.

A Look at Bed Bug Look-Alikes

The IPM Institute of North America has a review of five commonly encountered pests, including bat bugs (pictured), that can be misidentified as bed bugs.