Record-Breaking Italian Disinfestando Event Held in Rimini, Italy

Record-Breaking Italian Disinfestando Event Held in Rimini, Italy

More than 1,900 people attended Italian Disinfestando, an exhibition with an accompanying seminar program organized by Associazione Nazionale della Imprese di Disinfestestazione. The event was held March 8-9 at the Palazzo dei Congressi in Rimini.

March 27, 2017

Editor’s note:  More than 1,900 people attended Italian Disinfestando, an exhibition with an accompanying seminar program organized by Associazione Nazionale della Imprese di Disinfestestazione. The event was held March 8-9 at the Palazzo dei Congressi in Rimini. Frances McKim of UK Pest magazine filed the following report.

RIMINI, ITALY – Held over two sunny spring days, this set the tone for the warm and welcoming reception for all those who arrived to attend Disinfestando. The Palazzo dei Congressi is light and airy, with plenty of places to sit and hold meetings whilst enjoying suitable refreshments. 

The event was certainly popular and exhibitor stands were busy for both days with visitors, the vast majority of whom were Italian practical pest controllers. Although there were more international delegates than seen at previous Disinfestando events, it is always an encouraging sight to witness that the bulk of the exhibition visitors came from their home market. 

Likewise the exhibitors predominantly came from Italy too. In total there were 48 exhibitors. If the multinationals such as Syngenta, BASF and Bayer are discounted, there were only six non-Italian exhibitors and these were all European – from the UK, Spain, France and Hungary.

Commenting on the number of delegates, Sergio Urizio, ANID’s CEO, said: “Of the European events, we feel that Parasitec, when held in Paris, attracts the largest number of visitors, followed by ourselves and then PestEx in London.” 

Another unique feature of this Italian event is not only are the majority of exhibitors Italian, but a very large number of these are privately owned family businesses that have been trading for many years. Good examples being Blue Line, INDIA, Colkim, GEA, OSD, Martignani ,Vebi and Zapi to name just some.

Celebrating ANID’s 20th anniversary
This ‘family business approach’ is also mirrored in the servicing company membership of ANID. Celebrating its 20th anniversary, total membership now runs to around 300 – a somewhat greater number than the initial 40 members on day one.

At a special celebratory event held on the middle evening, commemorative certificates were presented to those companies who joined at the start and are still, to this day, still members – amazingly 30 in total. It is now a second generation of family managing these companies, but it is this family approach which undoubtedly leads to the warm and friendly atmosphere at these events. All credit should go to Sergio Urizio who had led ANID since its inception – but Sergio is far too modest to claim the limelight, as he puts the success down to the team of people who have worked alongside him throughout.

Focused international seminar sessions
On day one, there was just one major seminar session billed as a round table on the implications of the Biocidal Product Regulation for anticoagulant rodenticides and, in particular the practice of permanent baiting. There had been a real effort on the part of the organisers, ANID, to attract an international audience so speakers ranged from across Europe.

Dr Elisa Capellán from regulatory consultants, Kaeltia Compliance Services provided an overview of the Spanish approach to permanent baiting as well as a summary of the Spanish system for mutual recognition of biocides. Andreas Beckmann from the German trade association, DSV, explained the German regulation governing permanent baiting. Dr Alan Buckle from the UK Campaign for Responsible Rodenticide Use (CRRU) had been invited to outline the UK’s approach but was unable to attend, but had provided a detailed summary, which was presented by ANID’s CEO, Sergio Urizio.

Speakers on the situation in Italy, not just relating to permanent baiting, but also to the use of anticoagulant rodenticides more generally and the changes that are on the horizon were: Dr Dario Capizzi from the Lazio region’s environment and natural systems department; Dr Pierpaolo Zambotto from the chemical industry association ASSOCASA providing the rodenticide manufacturers viewpoint; Dr Simone Martini, a research consultant; and Dr Ugo Gianchecchi, a professional pest control consultant. The session was chaired by Professor Pasquale Trematerra and the recently elected President of ANID, Marco Benedetti.

To summarize there were some similarities between the countries, but also some wide variation in the approach to permanent baiting – the practice of leaving rodenticide in bait stations for long periods as a means of preventing and/or monitoring for rodents, regardless of whether there is any evidence of recent rodent activity.