Polar Vortex May Have Reduced Stink Bug Populations in Northeast, Midwest

Polar Vortex May Have Reduced Stink Bug Populations in Northeast, Midwest

Virginia Tech research suggests the polar vortex may have eliminated a large portion of the pests in these regions.

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February 19, 2019

A Virginia Tech research experiment estimates the polar vortex may have killed 95 percent of the stink bugs that hadn't found shelter to stay warm this winter, the National Pest Management Association stated in a release.
 
NPMA noted that invasive species in the Northeast such as the emerald ash borer and southern pine beetle aren’t likely to survive the winter cold, but New York City cockroaches and bed bug populations will unfortunately not be affected. Also, even if adult pests freeze, they may have already laid eggs which will hatch when the weather warms.
 
As for pests like ants, mosquitoes and termites, many people assume they just die off, but the truth is that these and other insects often devise strategies to make it through the winter. 
 
NPMA explained how specific pests survive the harsh elements.