Secret Site Map
Saturday, September 20, 2014

Home News EPA Finalizes Pyrethroid Label Changes

EPA Finalizes Pyrethroid Label Changes

News Coverage

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has approved revisions to pyrethroid labels.

| January 25, 2013

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency late last year approved revisions to pyrethroid labels that permit PMPs to make outdoor applications beyond applications to cracks and crevices and spot treatments, provided the application is made through the use of a coarse, low pressure spray over a treatable surface (bare soil, lawn, turf, mulch or other vegetation) and not an impervious surface like a driveway or sidewalk. More recently, EPA formally notified pesticide registrants of the label change. Click here to read EPA's communication to the registrants.
 
EPA originally decided to limit the outdoor non-agricultural use of pyrethroids in 2009, because of potential impacts on aquatic species.  Those labels began showing up last year. Among other things, the labels largely limited the outdoor use of pyrethroids to crack and crevice and spot treatments. NPMA, along with the Association of Structural Pest Control Regulatory Officials, an organization representing state pesticide regulators, and the State FIFRA Issues Research and Evaluation Group, an EPA advisory committee also comprised of state regulators, recommended to EPA that the labels be further changed. 
 
The recently approved language should begin showing up on labels by the middle of this year.


 

Top news

Patented Portable Heat Injector System Introduced

The new heating system was created with significant input from pest control companies.

Stoy Hedges Establishes Consulting Firm

After 25 years at Terminix, Hedges said it was time for a change in his career.

Agri-Turf Distributing Names Lon Records CEO

Records is a familiar face in the industry with a career that dates back to the early 1970s.

Australian Mosquito Found in L.A. County, LA Times Reports

An Australian mosquito capable of transmitting viruses to humans and heartworm to dogs was found in the San Gabriel Valley, the LA Times reported.

Suspect Arrested in Death of Jill Su

Police have arrested Dayont'e Omar Resiles in connection with the death of Su, wife of renowned UF Entomologist Nan-Yao Su, Local 10 News reported.