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Allen Fugler Resigning as FPMA EVP

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Fugler, who joined FPMA as EVP in 2007, will be resigning as executive vice president of the Florida Pest Management Association (FPMA), effective July 31.

Brad Harbison | July 14, 2014

Allen Fugler

ORLANDO, Fla. — Allen Fugler will be resigning as executive vice president of the Florida Pest Management Association (FPMA), effective July 31.

Fugler, who joined FPMA as EVP in 2007, told PCT he decided to leave FPMA to pursue other opportunities within the pest control industry. “I’m interested in a different career path, and I wanted to use my skills and experience in this industry in other capacities,” he said.

Reflecting on his 6-plus years at FPMA, Fugler said he was proud of helping FPMA streamline operations and maximize efficiencies. For example, FPMA’s biweekly e-Flash has helped the association better communicate association and industry news. Additionally, Fugler said he was proud of FPMA starting up a 501(c)(3) Florida Pest Management Foundation, which has made six awards of $500 to University of Entomology students, two of whom have remained in the pest control industry upon graduating, including NPMA Entomologist/Staff Scientist Bennett Jordan.

Prior to joining FPMA in 2007, Fugler worked for Louisiana Insurance Pest Control Association (LIPCA) as the vice president of marketing, beginning in 1997. He began his career in the pest control industry in 1991 as the executive director of the Louisiana Pest Control Association (LPCA).
 

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