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Crazy Ants Threaten Air Conditioners, Other Electronics

Ants

Live Science reports that tawny crazy ants can swarm inside air conditioning units, causing distress during the hot summer months.

| June 26, 2013

Nylanderia fulva. Photo: Bugwood.org.

 

AUSTIN, Texas - Summer is in full swing, meaning that many folks around the United States will be cranking their air conditioners for the next few months. Add to the list of reasons that make the invasive tawny crazy ant such a problematic pest: they can cause your AC unit to go haywire.

Live Science reports that Austin, Texas PMP Mike Matthews, of The Bug Master, was recently called to a home because the air conditioning unit had been short-circuited by a swarm of crazy ants inside the unit. "When you open [the air conditioners] up, you see thousands of ants, just completely filling them up," Matthews told Live Science.

The ants are drawn to air conditioners and other electronic devices, including farm equipment, because unlike most ants, tawny crazy ants do not excavate their own holes and tunnels, Edward LeBrun of the University of Texas told Live Science. 

Read the full article here.

 

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